• Pain Management – Compounding Introduction  Pain is one of the most common reasons people consult a physician, yet it frequently is inadequately treated, leading to enormous social cost in the form of lost productivity, needless suffering, and excessive healthcare expenditures. Compounding combines an ageless art withy the latest medical knowledge and state-of-the-art technology, enabling specially trained professionals to prepare customized dosage forms that are just what the doctor ordered. The optimal dosage form depends upon the specific needs of each patient. Options include: Transdermal and topical administration are increasingly popular...

  • Pain Management - Chronic Pain  Chronic pain afflicts approximately 10-20% of the adult population. Advances in research and development have greatly enhanced our ability to treat both acute and chronic pain disorders. However, while the number of treatment options – including antidepressants, anticonvulsants, opioids, nonopioid analgesics, local anesthetics, and alpha adrenergic agents – for such conditions as polyneuropathy, postherpetic neuralgia, low back pain, soft tissue injuries, and arthritic conditions has expanded, many patients – particularly those with persistent pain – continue to experience inadequate pain relief and/or intolerable adverse effects....

  • Pain Management - Assessment  “Pain can be managed. Physicians must determine the severity and frequency of their patients’ pain experience to prescribe the most appropriate and effective pain management regimen. Pain treatment needs to be individualized. The goal of the initial assessment of pain is to characterize the pain by location, intensity and aggravating and relieving factors. Frequently, a 10-point Numeric Pain Intensity Scale or Visual Analog Scale is used to facilitate communication between the patient and health care professionals, and to monitor the adequacy of therapy. Regular follow up...

  • Pain Management - Treatment  Optimal treatment may involve not only the use of traditional analgesics such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and opiods, but may also include medications that possess pain-relieving properties, including some antidepressants, anticonvulsants, antiarrhythmics, anesthetics, antiviral agents, and NMDA receptor antagonists. By combining various agents which utilize different mechanisms to alter the sensation of pain, physicians have found that smaller doses of each medication can be used. Adjuvant drugs – including antihistamines and corticosteroids – are also available to enhance pain relief, treat concurrent symptoms and counteract...

  • Pain Management - Solving Problems  Successful long term pain management requires rapid, flexible, and expert responses to the changing needs of the patient. Patients and their loved ones should never allow pain to continue due to concerns about “being a complainer,” medication-related side effects, or fear of addiction or loss of control subsequent to the use of pain medications. Effective pain management is best achieved by a team approach involving the physician, patient, his/her family and often other health care providers.